Thursday, October 19, 2017

Introducing Cost Allocation Tags for Amazon SQS

You have long had the ability to tag your AWS resources and to see cost breakouts on a per-tag basis. Cost allocation was launched in 2012 (see AWS Cost Allocation for Customer Bills) and we have steadily added support for additional services, most recently DynamoDB (Introducing Cost Allocation Tags for Amazon DynamoDB), Lambda (AWS Lambda Supports Tagging and Cost Allocations), and EBS (New – Cost Allocation for AWS Snapshots).

Today, we are launching tag-based cost allocation for Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS). You can now assign tags to your queues and use them to manage your costs at any desired level: application, application stage (for a loosely coupled application that communicates via queues), project, department, or developer. After you have tagged your queues, you can use the AWS Tag Editor to search queues that have tags of interest.

Here’s how I would add three tags (app, stage, and department) to one of my queues:

This feature is available now in all AWS Regions and you can start using in today! To learn more about tagging, read Tagging Your Amazon SQS Queues. To learn more about cost allocation via tags, read Using Cost Allocation Tags. To learn more about how to use message queues to build loosely coupled microservices for modern applications, read our blog post (Building Loosely Coupled, Scalable, C# Applications with Amazon SQS and Amazon SNS) and watch the recording of our recent webinar, Decouple and Scale Applications Using Amazon SQS and Amazon SNS.

If you are coming to AWS re:Invent, plan to attend session ARC 330: How the BBC Built a Massive Media Pipeline Using Microservices. In the talk you will find out how they used SNS and SQS to improve the elasticity and reliability of the BBC iPlayer architecture.

Jeff;



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Crawler rc – joystick #3DThursday #3DPrinting

from Crawler rc – joystick #3DThursday #3DPrinting
by Pedro Ruiz

draynnov83 shares this great design for a RC Crawler!

download the files on: http://ift.tt/2xUxkSK


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

Dual Extrusion Rocketr #3DThursday #3DPrinting

from Dual Extrusion Rocketr #3DThursday #3DPrinting
by Pedro Ruiz

Geoffro shares:

Give your dual extruder a workout!

download the files on: http://ift.tt/2yCisHU


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

Forbidden Watchtower #3DThursday #3DPrinting

from Forbidden Watchtower #3DThursday #3DPrinting
by Pedro Ruiz

kijai shares:

I modeled this after the box art of the tabletop game Forbidden Island.

The tower is hollow so you can add a LED inside, the base has some room for a battery but it’s not specifically designed for any particular setup.

There are files for merged whole model (still hollow) and separated roof options.

Funnily enough a LED tealight could be used upside down like in one of the pictures to make it look like a lighthouse! For that to fit better you should scale the model up a bit and print the flat roof option.

download the files on: http://ift.tt/2wK9R2g


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

Nerf Stryfe Rangefinder mod #3DThursday #3DPrinting

from Nerf Stryfe Rangefinder mod #3DThursday #3DPrinting
by Pedro Ruiz

vaeddyn shares:

This is a case specifically designed to fit on the left side of a Nerf Stryfe and mount a particular homebrew electronics package, consisting of a Raspberry Pi Zero fitted with a Pimoroni Rainbow Hat and an ultrasonic rangefinder. The LEDs, alphanumeric display, and capacitive buttons are all available from the back of the case while the rangefinder looks forward to, well, find range. A slot on the right side of the case admits wires, since power, magazine sensing switch, and trigger switch are all located inside the body of the Stryfe.

download the files on: http://ift.tt/2yToyEI


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

MAKERbuino Case Remix #3DThursday #3DPrinting

from MAKERbuino Case Remix #3DThursday #3DPrinting
by Pedro Ruiz

n602 shares this great design for a MAKERbuino!

download the files on: http://ift.tt/2yuHCZC


649-1
Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

Exponential rise of IoT and invisible payments

from Exponential rise of IoT and invisible payments
by Chahira Akel

Exponential rise of IoT and invisible payments

By Fabrizio Burlando Fintech executive and investor focused on payments, innovation and data. Senior Vice President, Region Head Europe, MasterCard Advisors. International FinTech executive and investor, focused on Payments, Innovation and Data. From 2013 he has led MasterCard Advisors in Europe, a 250-people boutique specialised in data-driven insights from the payments world for financial services and retailers. Alumnus of BCG, INSEAD and Yale, he divides his time between Rome and London.

If you’re excited about buying something, it’s not the payment itself you look forward to, it’s the overall experience. The feeling of walking away with a new gadget or item of clothing we’ve been thinking about is what we like to enjoy.

In today’s hyper-fast world, the act of paying takes up precious energy and time. A busy London restaurant recently admitted that waiting and paying for the bill consumed up to 20% of the time people spent at the table.

Digital payments – at least in their current infant form – don’t really differ, and are anything but consistent. The launch of tokenised mobile wallets has improved user experience, but there is still a bewildering range of cumbersome choices which have emerged in the past years, creating consumer confusion.

The killer feature for “digital payments 2.0” will paradoxically be their absence. It will be the era of invisible payments, which will save an enormous amount of time, energy and stress. Early examples of this already exist and you will have experienced them if you’ve used Uber or shopped at an Amazon Go store.

But the real push to invisible payments will be come with the rise of the Internet of Things, which promises an estimated 50 billion connected devices by 2020 according to some sources.

When Netmarket made the first e-commerce transaction by selling a Sting CD in 1994, this was the moment the internet became mainstream.

Source: irishtechnews.ie

Read more…

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